The human heart can generate enough pressure to squirt blood 9 meters away.

[Cancelled] The Pride Of Hiigara - Phase 3: Electronics
MOAR APPLES UPDATES!

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Delivery came today. That sander is a beaut! Also got the three boards of plywood, respirator and cartridges, and beading.

I've already mounted one of the boards on the other side of the perimeter. All the side screws are in, so I just need to drill the bottom screws in, as well as finish the bottom ones on the first board. I shall busy myself with that tonight and tomorrow. Until then...

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You can totes hook them sanders up to a vacuum and not have to worry about dust at all.

It's what my parents do when they're sanding the logs!
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Yep, that's the plan! No point wasting money on special dust bags when I have a vac that can do an even better job of dust extraction. Especially important in a place like my bedroom where I'd want to minimise that!
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Small update:

Haven't done much lately, what with my flight to LA taking almost four days, and my roommates being around. However, I've been working on other things in the meantime.

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Above is an oversimplified circuit diagram of the electronics. Due to the limitation of the program I made it in, a few things had to be done incorrectly, but it gives a general idea of what will be wired up. Notes of interest:

- As shown in under the AC and the PSU sections, there will be three PSUs, each unit obtaining power from three separate outlets/circuits.

- I will build a small control panel on the side of the unit, atop the left perimeter. This will contain some master controls, such as individual toggle switches for the live and neutral sides of each power cable, for a total of six power switches. These switches are labeled S1, S2, S4, S5, S7, and S8.

- On the control panel, an indicator light will be placed to show that power is available for a specific PSU. This light will only illuminate when both the live and the neutral switches are on, for the respective PSU. They are labeled L1, L2, and L3.

- A 15A analogue AC ammeter will be connected to each PSU in series on the neutral line. From what I've read, this is safer than putting it on the live side, but if anyone thinks I should change this, let me know.

- A 300V analogue AC voltmeter will be connected in parallel on each PSU.

- Also on the control panel will be three starter switches. These will be used to turn each PSU on, using the same principle as shorting the green cable on the 24 pin motherboard cable. The only difference is that a switch is used instead of a paperclip. These switches are labeled S3, S6, and S9.

- Symbols R1 to R6 represent the collective computer hardware and peripherals. I've drawn it like this for simplicity, rather than schematic accuracy.

- The control panel will also contain a water temperature indicator. This is (incorrectly) represented by the thermistor symbol R7. The thermistor itself will be what is immersed in the water loop of the water cooling system, and an analogue dial will be physically on the control panel, but the drawing program I used was limited in functionality, so I improvised.

- L4 to L8 represent the LEDs that will be providing the backlight for the design layer. These will be controlled by switch S10. To create a fade on/off effect, a capacitor will be used, marked C1. I had originally thought of programming a microcontroller to achieve this effect, but caps are cheaper and simpler. Though a microcontroller could also be programmed to control individual sections of lighting, as well as ways to modify the lighting based on events such as high water temperature, so that's still a possibility. For now, caps.

Long post for a small update! Anyway, I've already ordered the ammeters and voltmeters a while back for about 60 bucks in total, along with those aircraft style red flip-up guards for the toggle switches. Didn't seem like it was worth mentioning as an update at the time though. ETA should be around early April, because China shipping.

As for the progress on the front face, I need to wait until I'm alone, so I can continue sanding down a bit of the center section's side. Then I can mount it, and secure it to the bottom perimeter via the long wood screws, and to the left and right parts of the front face at the top using my last two flat braces. Then I need to go buy more braces. Also one of those flexible shafts for drills. Not sure when I'm going to have a proper progress update though. My next two flights are also to the US, which means lots of time away from home!
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This is actually becoming really complex.
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(2015-03-09, 12:18:12 AM)hiigaran Wrote: ...

- L4 to L8 represent the LEDs that will be providing the backlight for the design layer. These will be controlled by switch S10. To create a fade on/off effect, a capacitor will be used, marked C1. I had originally thought of programming a microcontroller to achieve this effect, but caps are cheaper and simpler. Though a microcontroller could also be programmed to control individual sections of lighting, as well as ways to modify the lighting based on events such as high water temperature, so that's still a possibility. For now, caps.

Long post for a small update! Anyway, I've already ordered the ammeters and voltmeters a while back for about 60 bucks in total, along with those aircraft style red flip-up guards for the toggle switches. Didn't seem like it was worth mentioning as an update at the time though. ETA should be around early April, because China shipping.

As for the progress on the front face, I need to wait until I'm alone, so I can continue sanding down a bit of the center section's side. Then I can mount it, and secure it to the bottom perimeter via the long wood screws, and to the left and right parts of the front face at the top using my last two flat braces. Then I need to go buy more braces. Also one of those flexible shafts for drills. Not sure when I'm going to have a proper progress update though. My next two flights are also to the US, which means lots of time away from home!

Ooh! That'll look very nice. Do you have a physical layout in mind for the panel?

Having the lighting intensity correspond to the water temperature would be pretty sweet.
The fading from the capacitor will be simple and classy to start with.
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Not yet. The measurements provided on the eBay page for the meters were...unusual. They didn't make sense in any unit of measurement. Either way, I'm guessing they won't be excessively large, otherwise they'd cost more, and if they are tiny, that's okay, as long as the readings can be read easily enough.

Regarding temperature dependent lighting...nah. Too impractical.

(2015-03-09, 02:23:26 PM)Talifan9 Wrote: This is actually becoming really complex.

To be honest, circuit diagrams have a habit of making simple things complex. Its so much easier to have the components in front of you.

Sorting out the electronics will be the easy part. The most challenging part will be the acrylic cutting. I'm really not looking forward to that.
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Small update:

Received my switch guards! Loving them already!

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Screwed them onto my toggle switches and played around with them for a few minutes. It's almost perfect. I'll need to make a small alteration though. On the switch itself, there is a small slot in the threaded area where those thin nuts screw onto. This slot aligns with a protruding piece on the switch guard, so that the guard remains aligned with the screw. Now, when I have the guard on, the way the switch works is that you need to flip the guard up to move the switch into the 'on' position, and pushing the guard back down will also move the switch into the off position. This makes sense for most applications, as these guards are supposed to prevent accidental triggering of something.

However, because these switches will be wired to the green cable on the power supplies, I'll need to achieve the complete opposite. That is, if I want to cut the power, I need to flip the guard up, then flip the switch off. To switch it back on, I simply push the guard down, and it pushes the switch on.

Simple fix. Dremel with my trusty diamond cutting disk should fix it up perfectly.

In other news, the center section of the front face is partially mounted. The bottom perimeter mounting is done, and I've used one of my flat braces to join the right side to the center at around middle height. Haven't done it for the left side yet, as the wood is warped, and requires moisture treatment first.

I might head out to grab more supplies tomorrow. Not sure yet.
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Decided against buying supplies just yet. I figured I'd make more efficient use of my time and money if I worked with whatever supplies I have left, then do a bigger shopping later. So I worked on this instead:

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Pardon the shitty quality, but it should be clear enough to make out the newest addition on the right side. I've added the first latch that holds the unit to the wall. The small metal piece mounted to the wall has a C-shaped part which the latch secures in to. However, this latch was not designed for perpendicular usage. Only parallel. Otherwise, the latch just slips out from the C section. I worked around this with the solution to every problem in the world: Use a hammer.

Hammering the C section made it curl in on itself, stopping the latch from slipping out. From there, I just drilled two 5mm holes into the wall, hammered some anchor plugs in, screwed the C section in, and drilled the latch into the perimeter. Yes, yes, I know I shouldn't be using anchor plugs for something like this, but it works just fine. Gave it a stress test and all. If it starts to become loose at a later stage, shoving some debris and glue in there will make the plug's expansion more effective. It's really not worth making massive holes in the wall for stronger solutions.

Also, the dark line between the perimeter and the wall is not a shadow. I've added the beading to the back of the perimeter. Only had enough for the bottom and right sides though, so I'll need to buy some more.

Oh, and you can see how bad the warped wood is in the photo as well. It's requiring a lot of moisture to straighten out, but it's getting there. Once it's reasonably straight, I'll get my last flat brace, and connect the adjacent front face section to it.
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So, I'm in the process of ordering some more stuff, which includes paint brushes and rollers, more flat braces, some beading, and T-section metal bars to be used as back support for the front face.

I have a question for anyone who is a painter: What would you recommend for paint? I'm planning on starting with 2 liters of white paint (which I know won't be enough). However, I'm not too sure about the more technical aspects of painting, such as what to use for the primer and such. At this stage, I just know that the final layer would be an acrylic/water-based paint. I'm not too sure if I should go for a flat, eggshell, gloss, or satin finish though. From what I've been reading, eggshell or satin might be what I need. I want some shine to it, but not much, basically.

Also, I should probably specify that this paint would be used on the front face and perimeter.
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Voltmeters and ammeters have arrived!

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They're a little smaller than I expected, but it's not an issue. I think it might be to my benefit, actually.

I still haven't received my other order yet. Was supposed to be today, but no word on it so far. If I don't get it today, I won't get it for at least three days, as I'll be flying back to POOTISland. Not particularly bothered though, now that I have my gauges. I'll be able to grab a block of wood and start designing the master control panel.
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(2015-03-26, 09:37:08 PM)hiigaran Wrote: Voltmeters and ammeters have arrived!

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They're a little smaller than I expected, but it's not an issue. I think it might be to my benefit, actually.

I still haven't received my other order yet. Was supposed to be today, but no word on it so far. If I don't get it today, I won't get it for at least three days, as I'll be flying back to POOTISland. Not particularly bothered though, now that I have my gauges. I'll be able to grab a block of wood and start designing the master control panel.

Those look classy.
I am excited to see your designs for the control panel.

(What is POOTISland? Rainbowlaugh)
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Nothing too fancy. One row for three voltmeters. Another row underneath for the ammeters, another row under that for the LED power indicators, the next row for the temperature gauge, and the final row for the switches.

I know, lacks creativity, but hey, if you got an idea for something that looks better, let me know!

In other news, I've finished sanding the top three sections of the front face. They're ready to be mounted once I get my flat braces.

Also, POOTISland is Russia.
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(2015-03-26, 09:37:08 PM)hiigaran Wrote: ...POOTISland...
Ah, this reminded me of the language filtering we had on MC server quite a while back; many lulz were had by pasting ZWS to bypass it and watching the scrubs try to do the same (and fail miserably).


Also, /pong.
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Since I'm still waiting on that delivery, I figured I might as well get a start on those top sections:

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I've only put the side ones up, since I can secure them to the perimeter. Without the flat braces, I have no way of securing the middle section to any adjacent sections. That's also partially why the C-clamps are there.

So my experience using a Dremel as a drill was..interesting. The problem with it as I've mentioned before is that it's a tool designed for high RPM use, so it lacks the torque that a drill would have. That said, I was still able to successfully drill holes with it by pushing down on the wood in a pulsating motion, rather than a continuous one. It was surprisingly effective. There were a few times when I pushed it too much and it locked up the tool, but no harm done.

Also, I've moved my smoke detector further away. I mentioned a while back that with the unit fully extended, it would hit the smoke detector, so I figured I should get that out of the way now. Gives me something to do.
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SOON