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[Cancelled] The Pride Of Hiigara - Phase 3: Electronics
#91
I've heard that taping over the areas before the cut can help with chipping.
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#92
Acrylic comes with a protective film over it to prevent scratches. You take that off when you're finished with the workpiece. Do you still tape it over that?
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#93
(2014-12-23, 04:16:06 PM)hiigaran Wrote: Acrylic comes with a protective film over it to prevent scratches. You take that off when you're finished with the workpiece. Do you still tape it over that?

I can tell you that they only had the one protective sheet (on both sides) when I got mine from the warehouse after they cut it for my lcars panel.
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#94
This guide for cutting acrylic has some good info on types of blades (for jigsaws) to get good edges:
http://www.bcae1.com/plexi.htm

I'll defer to its expertise.
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#95
Heh, that's where I've been getting my info from as well!

EDIT: Also, once I start using the jig-saw, I'm going to move my workbench operations to my room. It's going to be a really tight fit, but I really don't want to disturb the neighbours. This way, I'll only have to worry about my roommates, and they will either be off flying, or would agree to me working at a time that's suitable for them.
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#96
Going to be on low activity for about a month. A combination of my mother coming to visit, and a busy January roster will keep me from doing much. However, I have brought in some new supplies:

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Decided to get three 6 inch C clamps. I probably won't need that many, but too much is better than too little. I plan on using the clamps for a variety of things, including holding down a jigsaw guide to the workbench. It's a crude solution, but it works just fine. Plus, building it into the workbench would only make portability more of a bitch. Also grabbed myself a 90 degree angle clamp. I might need it when making the perimeter.

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Also grabbed a whole bunch of these. Top ones neatly arranged are sort of a combination of screws and bolts. They have the threads of bolts, but the heads of phillips screws. Attached to them are some standoffs. Basically nuts that are elongated. The idea behind these is that they screw into the acrylic, get fastened to it by tightening the standoff, then inserting the remainder of the screw into the base layer, and securing it on the other end with another nut.

Some standard bolts and nuts are also among my supplies. These will be for the wheels that I'll attach. The bunch of wood screws on the side will secure the front of the base to the perimeter, which is why they are so long.

I'll need to purchase a countersinking drill bit, so that the screws on the acrylic will sit flush with the surface. Otherwise the angled head will destroy the acrylic when I tighten it up.

I don't have an ETA on my next update, but I'm guessing it will be either near the end of January, or the beginning of February.
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#97
Been a while since I've had an update here...

So I've been inactive due to the fact that my mother had visited for a month, which meant I really couldn't have any time alone to work on my project, mostly due to the fact that loud noises and horrendous mess does not agree with her. Aaaaaanyway...

So I decided that it would be easiest for both myself and my roommates if my operations were done completely within my room. I had to turn my bed 90 degrees, and move my dresser into my wardrobe to make more space so that my both my workbench could fit, and I could comfortably stand in front of it.

Of course, what I had not counted on was performing all my measurements and pulling out a piece of plywood to draw lines on, only to find that my boards had been severely warped. Unfortunately during my mother's stay, the air con, which used to be set to maintain 22 degrees, had been adjusted by her to 17 degrees. The resulting temperature difference, and removal of moisture had resulted in the bowing and warping I now have to deal with.

Now for those who don't know, the reason plywood is so susceptible to warping is because it is made of several layers of thinner pieces of wood, with each layer alternating the direction of its grain by 90 degrees. The problem with these thin layers is that the top and bottom most layers are in most contact with the surrounding air, so what happens when one side dries out more than the other side due to moisture removal? That side shrinks, causing the board to curl inwards, towards the drier, shrunken side.

The solution? Add moisture back into the dry side to re-expand it, and try to get back the balance of moisture on each side of the board, so that everything is flat again (or reasonably flat, anyway. Assembly and bracing can fix the leftover unevenness). I'm doing this by wiping the dry side with a wet cloth. Not the entire side, mind you. Just the areas affected by the warping, starting around the peak (or rather, valley) of the warp, and moving outwards to the surrounding areas:

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As you can see from the places where I applied the water, the warp isn't a perfect bowing, where the peak/valley is perpendicular to the length of the board. Rather, it's a bit diagonal, which is why I've introduced moisture in an uneven manner. If you look hard enough, you can see where the board bends on the top and bottom edges.

Once this is done, the board is placed onto a flat surface (like my floor), concave down (wet side down), so that the weight of the board helps it flatten faster.

So far, I've repeated this process once, and I'm making progress. Waiting for it to dry a second time. I think it might be slightly warping the other way around now, so I'll put a bit of water on the other side to slightly reverse the process. I'll wait until the second run is dry first, though.
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#98
I am impressed at you resourcefulness. I would not have thought to repair the damage.

Well done!

What is your next step?
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#99
I intend to create the perimeter of the base layer next. That will be the pieces that attach to the rails mounted near the ceiling. Each side will consist of two pieces of wood, each half the length of the distance from the ground to the ceiling. Once I've got all found pieces measured, cut, mounted, and joined in pairs, I will connect both sides together at the bottom with another piece of wood running parallel to the ground. On this piece, the caster wheels will also be mounted. They will be mounted with nuts and bolts, and I'll adjust how much weight the wheels will support by adjusting the nuts, allowing the wheels to push harder upwards. This is so that I can find the right balance between how much weight is supported by the weaker rails, and the stronger wheels. The idea is to have the entire unit standing, rather than hanging.

EDIT: I did not expect this moisture treatment to work so well. The board is almost completely flat now! It still warped in the opposite direction, but only slightly. It's enough for me to continue work on the project. I'll cut the pieces out, and then repeat this moisture treatment again on each individual piece as necessary.

I need to sleep for my next flight, so in the meantime, I've clamped the board to my workbench. I love my trio of C-clamps. Those things are amazing!
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Woo, updates!

So last night I decided to grab some plywood, and begin measuring out the perimeter pieces. Basically, I measured the distance from the floor to the ceiling, and divided it by three. The result would be the length of the plywood, multiplied by 25cm (for its depth). Originally I was going to do this in two pieces, but I decided on three, as it makes more efficient use out of my stocks of plywood.

So after measuring, I began cutting. Half of it I did with my handsaw, and the other half with my bench-mounted jigsaw. Basically, the longer distances were with the jigsaw, as it would save time and energy. My major issue in the past with jigsaws was that I could never make straight cuts, even with an edge guide. However, in this bench-mounted configuration, I grabbed some extra plywood, positioned it in such a manner that would guide a workpiece along, and used a couple of C-clamps to secure it to the bench. It's simple, and it works amazingly. I would just adjust this makeshift guide left and right to cut at the right areas, and then feed my workpieces in.

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So far, I've created four pieces, out of six. I'll need to do that at a later stage, but time constraints stopped me from getting those done. Each piece so far looks like the one above.

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In the meantime, I've also made a start on mounting the first part of the perimeter to the rails. One on each side. To do this, I took out the inner portion of the rails, made the appropriate measurements, and screwed them into the plywood.

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From there, it was a simple matter of aligning each of the four rails back into their housings, and pushing it all in.

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Gave it a few test slides, and everything seems to be moving well enough. I've already repeated all this on the right side as well, and that one extends and retracts smoothly. However, on the left, it's a little bit jerky because when I originally mounted the rails, I made a small error in measurements on the second rail. Not a significant enough error that warranted fixing though. It's just got a little extra resistance to it, that's all.

So, where to from here? Obviously get the next two pieces attached on each side. I've still got two more pieces that are ready to be mounted, but as I mentioned, I still need to cut the final two. I'll also need to go buy some fasteners to attach each board to the next. I've got L braces, but those won't work. I basically need the flattened versions of them. Once all three boards have been mounted on each side, I can get the bottom part of the perimeter made and mounted, along with the wheels.

Also of interest, after I finished mounting the boards to the rails, I tested their holding capacity by hanging from them for a few seconds. Looks like they have no problem holding my skinny 50 kilo ass up. It's reassuring, as this means the two sides combined can hold 100 kilos just on their own. I'll still be placing the majority of the weight on the wheels, but I hadn't been too sure just how much weight those rails would be able to hold. In hindsight, I'm not sure why I even worried. That's the whole reason I purchased toggle bolts!

I'll be doing a Zurich flight over the next couple of days, and then I'll have about 2.5 days of useful free time. Hopefully during that time I'll be able to purchase the necessary parts. If I'm lucky, maybe I might even get the left and right sides of the perimeter completed.
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Small update:

It's nearing 2 in the morning here, so I haven't done much, considering most things I do will cause noise. Thankfully, the apartment will be empty tomorrow, so in preparation, I have decided to measure out the bottom part of the perimeter and prep that for my jig-saw. Three pieces in total. Once cut, I'll attach the wheels as well.

I've also started measuring where I'm going to be drilling in those large screws I purchased a while back. That is, the screws that attach the front face to the perimeter. I realised that I'm probably not going to be able to make perfectly perpendicular holes when drilling, so I decided to get creative once again.

Ladies and gentlemen, the first rule of woodworking: Under no circumstances are you to throw away scrap wood.

The second rule of woodworking is that there is no such thing as scrap wood.

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Using some of my scrap useful wood, I placed the pieces into my corner clamp, and joined them with a pair of screws. Using this simple little object, I can place it perpendicular to what I want to drill into, rest the drill bit in the corner of my makeshift tool, and drill. The result should be a much straighter hole than would be possible without any aids.

I've yet to test it out, but I should have tomorrow to do that!
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(2015-02-06, 07:58:35 AM)hiigaran Wrote: Using some of my scrap useful wood, I placed the pieces into my corner clamp, and joined them with a pair of screws. Using this simple little object, I can place it perpendicular to what I want to drill into, rest the drill bit in the corner of my makeshift tool, and drill. The result should be a much straighter hole than would be possible without any aids.

I've yet to test it out, but I should have tomorrow to do that!

To avoid the drill abrading the cleft and ruining the square, you could place 1-2 spare L brackets on the inside of the guide piece you've constructed!

If it works fine already, then excellent!
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I considered that, especially since I have a heap of L brackets, but I figured it's not going to be used beyond this project anyway. I've been desperate enough to try using a drill and drill bit as a substitute for a router and straight cut bit one time. It took a lot of time and force to wear through the wood. Besides, my L braces are either slightly curved, or has a little bracing notch on it, so neither variant would give me straight results.

Sadly, I haven't had the time to do anything today. Turns out my roommate had a change in his roster, so he's been here today, and will be tomorrow as well. So I used that opportunity to do my grocery shopping, which has been wayyyyyyy overdue!
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Back from my shopping run!

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Spoils of war include 20 flat braces, masonry drill bits, five toggle switches, four latches, and a cable track.

I intend to use three flat braces when joining my perimeter to adjacent perimeter sections. So with three sections on the left and right, plus another three at the bottom, I'd need 18 at the points of contact.

The masonry drill bits were something I purchased because at some point, I will need to remove the door stopper anchored into the floor, and drill it in another position, so that I don't accidentally open the door too much and damage the unit.

The toggle switches will also be something I will use much later on, but since I was there, I figured I might as well grab them. I wanted to get those red flip-up guards, but I couldn't find any. Guess I'll go to eBay for that.

The latches will be used to secure the unit while it is in its closed state. When fully against the wall, these latches will keep the unit against the wall and prevent it from moving out. The wheels have brakes, but these latches will close that final gap and keep it perfectly against the wall. So obviously this means that one part of the latch will be mounted to the wall, while the other part will be on the perimeter.

And finally, the cable track. It's much longer than what I need to use it for, but they sold them at a minimum length of a meter. I'm sure I can remove the segments somehow. Anyway, the point of the tracks will be for cable management. There will be several cables coming out of the unit. Multiple power cables, peripheral cables, etc. They need a movable section to go through, so that when the unit is puled out, nothing gets damaged.

I've got another flight after tomorrow, but departure is at such a time that I need to go to sleep tomorrow by 14:00. My roommate has a flight he will leave the apartment for at around 12:00. This should give me enough time to fire up my jig-saw and make those cuts that I was supposed to do yesterday.

At the moment, I've taken down one of the top perimeter sections, and joined the second section to it. I've done this with a combination of PVA glue, and the flat braces. I've also drilled holes into the front edge, where the front face of the base layer will be attached to, and screwed some of those long wood screws I purchased a while back into them at even spaces. I'll set it aside tomorrow, cut the rest of the wood, and attach the third piece in the same manner. At the very least, I'm hoping to get one entire side of the perimeter finished. If I'm quick enough, I might get the second section done on the other side of the perimeter as well. Doubt I'd get the third done in time.

...Of course, I could sacrifice an extra hour of sleep. It's just a flight to London Heathrow...

...on an A380...

...with a full load of passengers...

...

God dammit.
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Both the left and right perimeters are mostly done!

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So after taking down the first perimeter to place the second section on it, I set it aside, cut out the rest of the wood, and attached the third section to the first perimeter. Because I had used a combination of PVA glue, and the metal braces to fasten the sections together, I needed to let that dry out. However, due to a lack of time, I didn't want to wait that long, so I took the second perimeter down, and joined the second and third sections to it. Bit hard to see in the photo, but one perimeter is sitting on top of the other.

I also broke my 3mm wood drill bit, and two screw heads in the process. Bit sad at the fact that my drill bit broke. I've got backups, but they are the generic drill bits that are better suited for metal.

I'm really overdue for some sleep, so the final thing I need to do with the perimeter is to drill the long screws in, and then I can mount them on the rails again. That won't be done until I get back in two days.
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