The ostrich egg is one of the heaviest cells in the world.

[Cancelled] The Pride Of Hiigara - Phase 3: Electronics
#76
The toggle bolts are a good choice if you can't hit any studs.

I might choose a more understated castor if it was me, for aesthetic purposes, but you are the judge of how it'll all look.

Is the flooring in the area carpeting?
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#77
Yeah, I wouldn't want anything too big, but if I make it too small, it might not be strong enough to hold the weight.

Perhaps I could make a skirting to conceal the wheels. Something simple, like a bit of wood placed just in front of the wheels.

And the floors are stone tiles.

Quick update.

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Added the L brackets in the corners of the top boards to prevent the side boards from opening too much, and risking damage to the bench.

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Since the workbench is nearing completion, I figured it would be a good time to get the papers with the design printed on them, and cut them out. Grabbed my precision knives, and made a rough cut. There's still plenty of white around the edges, but I'm going to cut that later on.

The reason I used those knives instead of scissors is so that I can mostly retain the shape of the paper the shapes were on. I want to keep them in case I need them to determine the right distance between different parts of the design.

That's all for now! I'll be in potatoland for the next two days, but I've already requested further parts from my supplier. Hopefully I'll have them around the time that I get back.
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#78
I would worry about the big important stuff before worrying about concealing wheels.
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#79
Looking at my room, I'm still trying to work out how I'll be mounting the entire thing. I've already outlined one possible way, with the whole hinged thing, but I'm wondering if there's something else I can do.

On the ceiling to the left, there is this...thing. Yeah, real specific, I know. I'm not too sure what it is, but so you know what I'm referring to, in this photo, you can see a protrusion running parallel to the curtain tops. I'm guessing it's there to hide the curtain rails or something, because I can't think of any other purpose of it. It's hollow, and when I knock on it, it doesn't sound like its a support beam or anything.

So why is this relevant? I think I might be able to mount everything more securely if I installed some sort of rails on that side, and the side opposite (there is a suitable surface on the right side as well), as opposed to the hinge method. I'd still have wheels at the bottom, but the functional difference is that the entire installation opens by pulling it away from the wall, rather than swinging it open from one side.

Better idea, or stick to the hinge method?
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#80
Minor update!

Sorry for the lack of updates recently. I should be back in action now, especially with my latest delivery!

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I decided to go for the slide-out method, instead of the hinge method, so I got 8 heavy duty drawer slides. Dual rail, 16 inches. Extends out by a decent bit. 20 toggle bolts to go along with that. These babies should hold up a good portion of the unit's weight. Of course, the wheels will be doing that instead. Received another 5 caster wheels with brakes, exactly like the ones on my workbench.

Speaking of the workbench, I've also received my hinges, so I can now mount the final part of the workbench. Once this is done, the workbench is ready to be used for the acrylic stage.

This means that my work will now branch into two things. The first being the finalisation of the workbench, and the second being the very first steps of actually constructing the base layer. The drawer slides will be mounted in the appropriate locations using the toggles. Then, I will use my workbench and jigsaw to cut a perimeter for the base. The perimeter will serve as a standoff between the base and the wall, have the wheels mounted at the bottom, and get mounted to the rails. Once the perimeter is completed, the base can then begin to be mounted onto the perimeter. I may need to purchase some metal box tubing, or I beams to ensure that things remain straight, but I'll decide on this when the time comes.

For my workbench, I'm also going to need to build some sort of adjustable edge guide. Otherwise, there is no way in hell that I'll make straight cuts for my perimeter. Should be easy enough to make one. Make a T shaped guide by attaching two straight pieces of wood together, add two points where the I part can be tightened onto the workbench, and loosened to adjust the guide left and right as necessary.

See y'all when the workbench is completed!
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#81
Workbench can wait. Too excited not to do this. Folks, this is the point in my project where I can officially say that the work has truly begun!

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I know, I know, it doesn't look like much of a start. One drawer slide. Big whoop. That thing took me two hours to put up! The rails had to be removed, so that I could use the primary section to mark the place I'd be drilling. I then had to drill the hole with a 13mm masonry bit, which was 2 or 3mm smaller than the hole needed to be. I don't have a larger bit, so I did what do best, and improvised. I made the hole bigger with the 13mm by forcing the sides of the bit round in circles to gradually cut away the hole. So basically, I used my drill like a crude router. Popped the toggles on, reattached the slide rails, and pushed the entire assembly into the holes.

This is where it took ages. It was easy enough to secure one toggle with my ratcheting wrench, but due to where the slide is (ie, right in the corner), I couldn't use it on the second toggle. Since the toggles use manly bolts, instead of wussy screws (seriously, fuck Phillips heads), I needed to use some pliers to tighten that toggle up. This was the painstakingly long part that took up most of my time.

I've got five more of these to do, for a total of three on each side. If I can fit an extra one and make four on each side, even better. Not going to do them now though. Will do it sometime tomorrow.

Also, there's drywall dust EVERYWHERE.
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#82
Halfway there!

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Perfectly aligned! Though I suppose it's no surprise. When you install a toggle bolt, you have to make a hole large enough for the toggle to fit through, which means the bolt itself will have a lot of wiggle room. Install the toggle bolt, move the whole piece into the position you want, then tighten. I love these babies!

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Fully extended. No idea why that third one extends more than the others. Or maybe I didn't properly pull out the others. Doesn't matter either way.

Now to repeat the same step on the other side!
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#83
High end cards? Are you sticking like 7 295/Titan z's on it?
I can't see this taking "a few thousand" dollars.
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#84
I'm expecting between 8 to 10 thousand.

Quick update folks. Added the final part of the workbench's top, so now the workbench is complete. I'm going to make one more addition to it though, and that's an adjustable fence or guide for the jigsaw, so I can make straight cuts. No photos yet.

I'm going to take an hour or two off, and then finish the other half of the rail mounts.
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#85
Soooooooooooooooo.............Did you ever conjure up a rough estimate of PPD for the new system? I might have to go shopping after I see the finished product Twilightsmile

How far were you planning on keeping the GPUs from the MoBo? It seems that the common 6-foot USB 3.0 cables will work fine, just no hubs or powered extenders.

Here's a server motherboard with 11 PCIe slots, although I never built anything relating to servers. With the USB risers, all 11 slots could potentially be used, I'd assume. It supports up to an unessecary 1.5TB of memory. Would you happen to know if this type of motherboard would work with folding, as far as hardware goes? It would have to be linux, since windows would limit GPUs to a total of 8.

I'd like to research a little and see if I can build the most efficient folding farm. I've heard of computers without hardrives or monitors. Have one computer running several nodes. Something like that.

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#86
That looks quite a bit more expensive than just getting two consumer level boards with 5 to 7 PCIe slots each.
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#87
I'd still stick with my $35 motherboards anyway. The CPU and mobo can be had for less than $100. Now, if I were rich, I'd build all kinds of computer configurations with unnecessarily expensive hardware. Or I'd build a supercomputer that could produce a billion PPD for B@H. Aside from the graphics cards, the rest of my hardware is pretty low-end and cheap. I'm building a third crate computer between christmas and New Years.

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#88
I wouldn't mind shelling out four to five hundred on a single mobo that can take 7 cards. It's an aesthetic thing as well. Sticking two mobos onto my wall will be difficult to present well.
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#89
(2014-12-22, 01:23:17 AM)hiigaran Wrote: ...
Now to repeat the same step on the other side!

It's looking fabulous!

I'm excited for your first install steps.
Looking forward to seeing you cut some acrylic!
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#90
I'm quite nervous about the acrylic cutting. I've never done that before. So far all I know is to use the finest blade you can find, and keep the jig-saw speed just right. Too fast, and it melts the acrylic with friction. Too slow, and the edges chip, requiring a lot of sanding work afterwards.
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SOON